A New Beginning

The holiday season is over and many organizations will be faced with staffing issues.   January is usually a time of resignations, terminations and forecasts. Planning ahead for this recurring reality is now even more important as we predict that 2015 is the year that intense recruiting competition returns.

That is because after years of slack hiring, the competition for top performers and technical talent will increase over the next year to the point where current recruiting resources and tools will be stretched to the limit. Aggressiveness, the need for counteroffers, higher rejection rates, and a renewed focus on recruiting the currently employed will all return to prominence. As a result of this increased competition, executives will begin to put pressure on hiring managers to produce new approaches that provide them with a competitive talent advantage.

One way to improve efficiency in recruiting is working with a staffing firm. This relationship is an investment that can save your organization the time and money it takes to locate, interview, hire and train new employees.

At Legal Specialists, our expert recruiters specialize in helping law firms plan for their staffing needs now and in the future. We are here to help you address human resource requirements with contract, contract-to-hire, permanent placement, and payroll-only option services. Our experienced staffing professionals excel at placing the best candidates with best-fit jobs. Plus, we have access to deep pools of legal talent and candidate databases that the general public does not.

Contact us today to start talking about strategic staffing for 2015!

What’s Around The Corner?

A number of organizations are wondering what hiring and human resources will look like in the future. With the beginning of the New Year this is a great time to consider predictions. The following is what we expect to see in 2014 and beyond.

Temporary is the new permanent. One thing that will remain constant in this year is uncertainty. Given the current unpredictability in the economy – such as the recent governmental shut-down, stock market fluctuations, and reluctance to move ahead with new initiatives, we foresee firms will likely continue to bring on temporary workers when help is needed.

Part-time hiring on the rise. While various factors will influence hiring trends, we anticipate employers will hire more part-time workers in 2014.

The way we work is changing.  Many firms are starting to re-evaluate their staffing needs and this development is particularly notable in the legal field.  Skilled attorneys, paralegals and other support staff are recognizing these new options and are entering the temporary and part-time labor pool. A number of clients feel that this is the best way to attract needed, skilled employees, and it provides greater opportunities for cost containment. In addition, bringing on an employee in a “try-before-you-buy” scenario can be a good way to assess whether a candidate is right for a position.

Demographic shifts are occurring.  An increasing number of individuals will look to contract, part-time work and other less-than-long-term employment. Here’s why: Younger workers are more mobile and receptive to contract staffing. Technology is providing the flexibility people need to use their skills in new ways.  Combine these and other factors with a firm’s focus on controlling expenses, and you have both the employment model as well as the needed workforce to propel growth.

Are you ready to see how temporary staffing solutions can benefit your firm’s objectives? If so, I would like to discuss your staffing requirements and help create a recruiting plan that will assist you in achieving them.

The Specialists Group’s 55th Anniversary!

September 3rd 2012 marked The Specialists Group’s 55th anniversary. As we look back over the past 55 years and see how dramatically the staffing industry has changed, we’re grateful that we, too, have been able to change while maintaining the highest level of client service.

Reaching a milestone like this was possible only because the company has had a great deal of support throughout its history. We would like to thank our employees for their past and ongoing contributions to our longevity and success.  We pay special tribute to our clients who have played a key role in the firm’s growth for more than a half-century.  We are also fortunate to have a network of applicants with whom we’ve enjoyed long-term relationships, and recognize them for their partnership.

As a privately-owned company we fully understand the importance of constantly striving to be better at what we do. Toward that end, we are committed to exploring new market opportunities and developing new services that will meet the needs of clients in the future. With the continued support of our employees, clients, and applicants, we have great confidence that we will remain the “Industry Standard of Excellence” for decades to come.

 

Use Social Media Sites With Care

Employers can benefit from using social media sites, if they use them – carefully.  Professional, and even personal, online networking sites are popular places to search for employees and build qualified pools of candidates. However, as social media networking and recruiting grow in popularity, employers need to use social media sites with caution, especially as a means of background checking.

Are job references, provided by an employee on a social media site, an official company reference for purposes of background checking and employment? No. Should employers utilize social media job references? Maybe. It is very important for  employers to remember that social media references are an informal acknowledgement that somebody, somewhere out there, likes a candidate enough to say so. But, this does not constitute an employment reference.  The dilemma lies in differentiating a friend or colleague’s social media recommendations from references authorized by a company.

I recommend considering the similarity of online references with other data you’ve gathered about a potential employee. Social media references can provide interesting additions to your potential employee’s profile, but take them for what they are worth. Regard references in social media the same way you would consider personal recommendations from family and friends.

Effective Recruiting Strategies

Recruiting is one of the most crucial roles of any human resources professional but it can be a game of chance if it isn’t done correctly. An organization’s success can largely depend upon hiring the right individuals. Therefore, the investment in time and effort in creating an effective staffing strategy can prove to be very valuable.

Where to Begin.  The first step is to determine exactly what the requirements are of the position to be filled.  The next stage is to define the best strategy for obtaining candidates. Advertising on  job sites, social networking, referral programs, and job search engines may be used to gather as many candidates as possible. However,  cost effectiveness must be evaluated as HR departments in conjunction with other managers will devote time outside their normal duties reading and screening resumes.

In-House Recruiting.   If done internally, it is important to keep track of several very important parameters like where candidates are coming from, which source provides the best candidates and how many applicant submissions it takes to develop an interview pool. Measuring this will help show the best way to recruit for positions in the future.  Applicant tracking software is a way to stay organized throughout the hiring process.

Using a Recruiter.  Placement services are often able to provide the right employee in the shortest time. A professional recruiter has the ability to search, read and screen resumes, interview potential candidates and deliver a select group for consideration.  It is also cost effective in a way that saves firms from having to maintain large internal recruiting departments.  Moreover, contingency staffing agencies don’t get paid until a candidate is successfully hired, and thus the risk is shifted almost entirely to the placement firms.

Putting it all Together.   Measuring results can quickly ascertain which methods are the most effective.  This will increase the chances of finding better candidates and reduce the time to hire and the costs involved.  In short, developing and following through with an effective recruiting plan should pay off significantly.

Stress

Every individual must find their own way to work productively even under stressful conditions.  Of course, one way is to adopt an attitude of not caring what anyone else says or does, or what decisions management makes.  That attitude however will not put one’s name on the top of the promotions list, nor will it assure merit raises.  However, one’s doctor may approve.   But… who will pay the doctor’s bill?

Generation Why?

Ever wonder why that 24-year-old new hire comes off as being a little too competitive, confidently eyeing your office as if it’s up for grabs?  Who is this kid acting like the boss on their first day?  Don’t worry, there’s an explanation for this and it’s called Generation Why. Also known as: Generation Y, Millennials, Gen I (Generation Internet), Generation Next, Adultolescents and Echo Boomers.  The work force is changing and this group will soon account for the majority of workers, especially as Baby Boomers start to retire.

The generation of workers born roughly between 1977 and 1995 rivals the boomers in numbers, and is proving to have a significant influence as well.  It’s not just their multitude that makes Generation Next important to the labor market.  They’re unlike previous generations, and that’s forcing a shift on firms and managers. From wanting to make an impact on day one, to independently tackling huge challenges, Echo Boomers are requiring employers to adjust, not only to their behavior, but also to what seems to be a whole new set of career expectations.

Adultolescents are more concerned with an organization’s culture, than the job.  They prefer open communication and to interact freely.  An uptight formal traditional business style of culture is not going to attract and retain Generation Next.  This is forcing human resource managers to adjust, for example, methods of recruiting and retention, especially in order to hire and keep the best young talent.  Don’t endorse the old factory mentality, “when you’re at work you work, no down time.” Encourage free communication and promoting teamwork.  Just a little fun will go a long way!

Along with seeking work to be more meaningful and challenging, Generation Internet also aims to make significant impact in a short amount of time.  They want to work faster and better than others.  Their work ethic, which can be viewed as competitive, may well be an outcome of being independent and tech savvy.  The Twentysomethings are like living, breathing search engines.  Not only do they ask question after question, they’re quick learners and quick to put together information.  In that way, they are incredible assets.

With the ever-changing workforce, understanding and adapting to the new values and demands of Generation Y will no doubt be an important factor. In the coming years, Millennials will be called upon to help fill the big shoes left by exiting boomers.  These workers could force you to rethink and improve methods of recruiting, training, and management – the lifeblood elements of any organization.